• Katea

    I am not tech savvy but would like to figure out how to utilize this tool..how do you transfer from Word to the IPAD or tablet?

  • Paul Etterling

    I presonally prepare my notes using MS Word with the settings to landscape and 2 sheets per page. This establishes the page as 5.5 x 8.5 inches. In doing so, there is little need to zoom on the iPad when preaching. Once the PDF is created, I will make further edits if needed within Good Reader. Because I always seem to have last minute thoughts that I want to add into the notes. Good Reader is a great app!

  • Thomas

    sounds good, but why all the priests use an ipad? catholic marketing ? iam a priest, never used apple products, cause the poor people look at me. u understand ? i also don’t drive a mercedes…

  • Mike

    I personally can’t stand watching pastors preach from an Ipad. I’m 29, so not like I am an oldie trying to shoot down the younger generation, but it does bug me. Unless of course the speaker disguises the Ipad is there? I have seen to many preachers at seminary that distract themselves by them. However, I do think you have to choose what works for you. Just one thought though, if we are around in the very very end times, it may be that we are forced to use pen and paper……. so don’t throw out your pens yet!!

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  • Gabriel Rodriguez

    Great article. I’ve been preaching/teaching from my iPad for two years now, and I haven’t gone back. I use Kindle app for my notes, but I think I’ll give GoodReader a try.

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  • Indra kc

    Best one.I found it as awesome one.

  • Luke

    I like all of your suggestions but would add that rather than a PDF reader I have found preaching directly from Evernote to work well for me. I do my prep in Word and then copy and paste the text into the Evernote editor, then I boost the font to 16-point so that I can easily read it on the iPad. I also link the Word file into the same note so that if I want to do any edits I have it available. I organize each sermon in Evernote into a notebook by Bible text, and then tag each one with the date on which I will preach it. Then I have all of my notes for a single date in a single place. I prefer this over a PDF reader because If I zoom in a PDF reader, I have vertical scroll and that just doesn’t work. I preach with the iPad in portrait mode. I was hesitant to go to the iPad until it was just as easy for me as paper, and now it is. I wish Evernote’s editor was nicer but in conjunction with Word it seems to work fine.

  • Aaron

    This is probably a trivial point but… if you’re going to use Elizabethan English, please use it consistently: thou shalt … thy (“thine” before words that begin with a vowel)– or just use modern: You shall … your…
    For some of us (yes, we’re sick and twisted) mixing thou with your is like dragging fingernails across a blackboard (remember those?)

  • Keith

    Thou shalt use the side switch to lock the rotation. It can be a little frustrating if you momentarily pick-up your I-pad and have to orient it so that you can see your notes.

  • David

    I understand the psychology of number 6, but the attempt to provide a theological rationale is laughable. If using your pad (I don’t have one, by the way) implies your authority comes from Steve Jobs, your hard-copy bible just implies your authority comes from Hodder & Stoughton or the Oxford University Press (depending on which version you use)….

    • Very true. Good point. Like I said, #6 is just a personal preference.

    • Gabriel Rodriguez

      Having a physical bible is handy for times when you need to read a scripture the Holy Spirit drops on you and you did not include it in your notes. Fumbling around the iPad (no multitasking) is distracting, pulling out your phone is too. Having a bible handy will allow you to search a verse much quicker.

  • Nehemiah

    Cussing is not good for an episode while preaching!

  • Robert Auer

    I preached once using an iPad – never again. I was using Pages and I hit something and it went to the bottom of my notes, took me 45 seconds to get back to my spot – (which of course felt like 45 minutes!) After that – I went back to paper notes with my iPad as the backup.

    • I have had that happen before too. That’s why I recommend using a PDF reader so you cannot mess up your notes mid sermon

  • Paulas

    thanks for very helpful tips. may be you shouldn’t have used the term The Ten Commandments… etc for this kind of article. I do not like people who try to lift themselves high by using biblical terms because it lowers the slandered of the word of God in front of the people of other faith. so just be careful. I loved your article but didn’t like your attitude for making it comparable with the title that is something very higher. hope you understand.

    • Paulas

      sorry I meant to say … it lowers the standard of the word of God towards the end of second line.

      • Thanks for the feedback. I meant no offense by it. I see how you can feel that way. I am not trying to lift myself high. Just trying to share a few tips I have learned that could help others.

  • Urban Ram

    I think a Kindle is a much better tool for preaching than an iPad (I own both). There is less to go wrong with a Kindle, it doesn’t have the problem of adjusting the brightness, and I find it more comfortable to read and hold. It is also cheaper to replace if it does get borrowed or baptised! I email my completed text as an RTF file directly to my Kindle. These days I usually write sermons using Google Docs or Evernote.

  • Marilyn Magallanes

    Makes me wonder whose been looking over my shoulder during Praise/Worship on Sundays. . ., Nevertheless – Perfect timing – This is very helpful. Thank you!:-)

  • Guest

    Makes me wonder whose been looking over my shoulder during Praise/Worship on Sunday afternoon. . ., Nevertheless – Perfect timing – This is very helpful. Thank you!:-)

  • Barry Whitlow

    Pastor Rick, I would love to know what online Bible study tool you use the most. There are so many, and I’m struggling to find one that works well for message prep. THANK YOU for the iPad information, incredible tool, I just started using it in ministry and for preaching, it really helps to know what apps others are using and how they are using it. Blessings! -Barry

    • Barry Whitlow

      My apologies Brandon, just noticed you wrote the article and not Pastor Rick. Would still LOVE a reply if you have time. No charge for the compliment : )

      • No problem. For reading the Bible I use The YouVersion Bible app. For deeper study, I use Logos. There is a free app with some functionality, but they have a ton of commentaries and other reference books available for purchase. I love having these with me wherever I go instead of having to carry stacks of books for research.

        Other than that, I use the Kindle app for other electronic books and resources from Amazon. Hope that help.

        I have a few posts on my blog about more of my favorite apps that you can also check out if you are interested.

        • Barry

          Brandon, I checked out the Logos Bible for iPad today and love it. Question: Do you know if when I make notes in it like I did in my paper Bible, if I can back them up in the Cloud somewhere? The cool thing about a paper Bible is you can write notes in it and pass it down, with notes from genration to generation Thanks again!

  • Chris Pollock

    All very good commandments. I sometimes go back to the handwritten sermon once in a while just to keep it sharpened, but the iPads flexibility has been very handy. I used to feel a little bad or techie using it, but I never carry it with me up into the pulpit or wave it around. Most people don’t notice now.

  • James

    John, actually, I disagree. I started using my iPad mini to preach with last fall and will not go back to printed notes. I love being to edit the text on the fly after a service and before the next one. Plus, all of my messages are now in Dropbox and I’ve been to places where I’m asked to teach or preach (Africa) and it is really nice to be able to pull any of my sermons out of the cloud.

    • Dropbox is great. I also use Evernote to archive every sermon I have ever written. That Wayne matter where I go, like you said, I always have messages with me.

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  • john

    Just another example of using technology for no good reason. If you have a physical copy of your notes with you anyway, just use those and forget about the iPad and all the potential problems.You don’t need it.

    • There is absolutely nothing wrong with paper notes. I don’t always have a paper copy with me though. I personally keep an electronic copy of all my sermons in Evernote. So if something goes wrong my iPad, I can pull it up on my phone no problem.

      The benefit of this is saving paper and printer ink, and always having my sermon with me wherever I go. Waiting at a doctors office, a restaurant, or in between meetings I can pull up my sermon and either work on it or internalize it.

      My iPad is hardly useless. But I agree that it’s not for everyone. It’s just a tool like anything else. If it helps great. But if it gets in the way stick with what works for you.

      • Phil

        John,

        I have seen preacher’s notes blow off the pulpit, seen coffee spilled them before he got up to speak and go into a panic over loss of notes… The point is just because you are low tech does not mean you will not experience issues. I love my I Pad and have preached from it for over 2 years. When I visit other churches I have a plethora of sermons on hand if asked to preach. I have a library of over 30 books at my fingertips.

        Yes technology has potential problems, but so do notes and so does the preacher himself. Don’t knock it until you have tried it!!

  • Numbers 3 and 8 are new and helpful! The others I’ve learned the hard way! ha! Thanks!

    • Haha. Thanks. Yeah, I learned these the hard way too. Hoping to save others the trouble I went through.