Archives For Preaching

No other institution on earth has the potential to change the world and address global issues as the local church. No force on earth is as unstoppable as the local church when it is functioning as a unified body of believers. And nothing brings a church together in unity better than a growth campaign.

The greatest waves of growth that Saddleback Church has ever experienced have been the result of the various church-wide campaigns that we’ve done. When we set aside six to eight weeks to concentrate, as a church family, on a single theme, amazing things happen, such as…

  • People bring their friends, co-workers, and neighbors to church.
  • Hundreds of people are baptized.
  • All kinds of new small groups form and launch.
  • Some people give financially for the first time, and everyone sacrifices for the Kingdom.
  • The church grows larger, deeper, broader, warmer, and stronger.

As you plan your preaching over the next twelve months, plan at least one, if not two, opportunities for your church to align around a single theme. Some of our more well-known campaigns have included Decade of Destiny, 40 Days In the Word, What On Earth…

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The question often comes up: How can a service be both worship and seeker-friendly? At Saddleback, we believe you can have both without compromising either.

When we speak of worship, we’re talking about something only believers can do. Worship is from believers to God. We magnify God’s name in worship by expressing our love and commitment to him. Unbelievers simply cannot do this.

Here is the simple definition of worship that we operate with at Saddleback: “Worship is expressing our love to God for who he is, what he’s said, and what he’s doing.”

We believe there are many appropriate ways to express our love to God: by praying, singing, obeying, trusting, giving, testifying, listening and responding to his Word, thanking, and many other expressions. God – not man – is the focus and center of our worship.

God is the consumer of worship

Although unbelievers cannot truly worship, they can watch believers worship. They can observe the joy that we feel. They can see how we value God’s Word and how we respond to it. They can hear how the Bible answers the problems and questions of life. They can notice how worship encourages, strengthens and changes us. They…

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Years ago, I brought a group of high school students to a Christian conference in California. The first night, hundreds of high schoolers packed into the gymnasium to worship God and hear a message from the guest preacher. The preacher took the stage and gave a compelling sermon about how much we should love people. While the content was true and good, I walked out that night with a funny feeling about the sermon. Something was not right. Then, I realized the problem: the preacher made no mention of Jesus.

Is a sermon really a sermon without Jesus? More specifically, is a sermon ever complete without the preaching of the Gospel? I do not believe so. Every sermon should find its resolution in the Gospel—the good news of Jesus Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection to pay the penalty of our sins so that all who believe in him may receive forgiveness. The Gospel of Jesus Christ is the defining belief that distinguishes a Christian message from every other religious or self-help talk. A sermon without the Gospel is incomplete.

All Scripture is Fulfilled in Jesus

To understand why the Gospel should be in every sermon, we…

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My very first ministry internship was with a pastor who, by his own admission, wasn’t really into scholarly study.

“Brian,” I remember him telling me; “you’ll find that the guys out there leading the big churches are pragmatic leaders. That should tell you something.”

When Church Fads Backfire

What I remember most about him however was his penchant for getting carried away with the latest church fads to try to spur church attendance.

When I showed up that summer he was well into a “get everyone to the church at 5am to pray for exactly one hour” kick.

I heard through the grapevine that some well-meaning person slipped him a book on prayer and that was all she wrote.

For 13 weeks straight I would get up at 3:45am, take a shower, get dressed, and then make the 55 minute commute to the church building just in time to hit my knees and join the faithful.

For 60 minutes of prayer.

On my knees.

Every flippin’ morning.

For 13 weeks.

I kid you not.

“The Koreans are doing it and their churches are growing like wildfire,” I remember him telling me.

“That’s great,” I said, “but can’t God hear us just the same at 9am? And…

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Calendar

I’ve spent the last month or so mapping out the next year of preaching. That doesn’t mean I’m preparing a year’s worth of sermons in detail or that I won’t make changes along the way. Sometimes a congregation experiences unexpected transitions or cultural events, and sometimes God just makes it clear that what was planned isn’t the best message for the moment. So I’m flexible, but I want to think ahead.

I believe annual sermon planning is vital for several reasons.

1. TO BALANCE WHAT THE CONGREGATION IS BEING FED.

When I map out a year of sermons I try to be intentional about balancing certain factors, such as:

  • I want to teach from both testaments and every major genre of literature – narrative history, prophecy, poetry and wisdom, the gospels, and the epistles.
  • I want to touch on all of the major areas of systematic theology – bibliology (the Bible), soteriology (salvation), pneumatology (the Holy Spirit), anthropology (mankind), ecclesiology (the church), etc.
  • I want to talk about all five purposes of the church, and of life – worship, evangelism, discipleship, fellowship, and ministry.
  • I want to plan series designed to reach seekers, ground new believers, and take…

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Extending a public invitation at the conclusion of the preaching experience is no longer a normal part of local church worship.

My goal is not to debate this issue; however, I strongly believe it is obvious in the New Testament that people were given some kind of opportunity to respond to God. My goal today is to share four helpful things to keep in mind when you give a public invitation, asking others to respond to God.

1. Keep the invitation in mind from the beginning.

When you are planning your preaching and order of worship, keep the invitation in mind from the beginning. In reality, a message built on the Word of God and centered on the gospel should be an ongoing invitation to follow Jesus Christ.

The worship order does not need to be crammed from beginning to end, but should provide both flexibility and latitude. An invitation is not the pastor’s invite to follow Christ, but the Spirit’s invitation to respond to God. We need the flexibility and latitude to follow His leadership; therefore, time needs to be allocated.

2. Clarity in the invitation is imperative.

Oftentimes the public response during the invitation is…

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One of my biggest problems in sermon writing is what people call “analysis paralysis” – I get so involved studying for a sermon that, eventually, the more I study, the worse it becomes.

1. Do a Two-Minute Warning.

To cure this I started implementing something I call my “two-minute warning.” I stole it from my high school head football coach. Our high school football team went to the state championship (mostly due to our incredible coach and not so much because of the talent on the team).

Every Thursday at the very end of practice, the night before the big game, we would do what he would call the “two minute drill.” He would line us up on our own 10-yard line and then say, “Guys, you have two minutes to put the ball in the end zone.”

As the quarterback everything came rushing together — all the adrenaline, everything we had practiced, all the tips and ideas from our coaching staff — it all collided at that moment and forced me to quickly deduce what I needed to do to put the ball in the end zone.

I do a similar thing when I

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Many preachers believe the purpose of preaching is to explain the Bible, or to interpret the text, or to help people understand God’s Word. But these all fall short of what it really is.

Paul gives us God’s purpose of preaching in Ephesians 4:11-13 (NIV): “Christ gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists and some to be pastors and teachers to prepare God’s people for works of service so that the body of Christ may be built up until we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ.”

Why did God give prophets, evangelists, pastors and teachers? To produce Christ-like people. That’s the purpose of preaching: to help people become like Jesus.

How does this happen? Through application. The only way lives are changed is through the application of God’s Word. The lack of application in preaching and teaching is, I believe, the number one problem with preaching in America.

Too many sermons are nothing more than lectures on biblical backgrounds or obscure Greek and Hebrew words. As a result,…

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Pastor, you’re surrounded by dirt.

To be more precise, you’re surrounded by soil – all kinds of soil. In your community, you have people who are ready to respond to the Gospel and people who aren’t. Your job is to isolate the good soil and plant your seed there.

Jesus clearly taught this notion of spiritual receptivity in the Parable of the Sower and the Soils (Matt. 13:3-23). Like different kinds of soil, people respond differently to the Good News. Everyone is not equally ready to receive Christ. Some people are very open to hearing the Gospel and others are very closed. In the Parable of the Sower, Jesus explained that there are hard hearts, shallow hearts, distracted hearts, and receptive hearts.

If you want your ministry to maximize its evangelism effectiveness, you need to focus your energy on the right soil. That’s the soil that will produce a hundred-fold harvest. Take a cue from those who work with actual dirt. No farmer in his right mind would waste seed, a precious commodity, on infertile ground that won’t produce a crop. In the same way, I believe…

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Hebrews 13:17 declares, “Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account. Let them do this with joy and not with groaning, for that would be of no advantage to you.“ In other words, don’t take your church leaders for granted. Instead, bring joy to their life by the way you treat them.

In light of this, here are five quick ideas to bless your pastor(s) this week:

  • Send him a handwritten note of appreciation. Be sure to mention specific ways he has influenced your life for Christ. Most pastors have no idea if they are making a difference and would be thrilled to receive such a note.
  • Gather a small group of people to pray over him before a Sunday service. There is nothing more reassuring prior to preaching than to know that your congregation is praying for you. It reminds him that he is not preaching to adversaries, but rather to fellow believers wanting to join him in hearing the Word of the Lord.
  • Talk positively behind his back. The temptation to gossip about church leadership is strong….

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Leadership comes with a microphone.  This is because in every leader’s life there comes a time when they must stand up and say, “Follow me!”

In an effort to help provide leaders with the best public speaking tools, I turned to the greatest leadership book ever written – the Bible.

In 1 Chronicles 28-29, King David stands before the nation of Israel and calls them to sacrifice for the construction of Solomon’s Temple.  In addition to casting vision for this legendary facility, there is an increased level of drama because David is handing the mantle of leadership to his son Solomon just prior to his death.

As I read the text, the following are 20 Things Great Public Speakers Do I gleaned from these two chapters.  First is the lesson followed by the supporting text.

  1. Great Public Speakers Know Their Audience – 28:1 – “Now David assembled at Jerusalem all the leader of Israel, the officers of the tribes and the captains of the divisions who served the king, the captains over thousands, and captains over hundreds, and the stewards over all the substance and possessions of the king and of his sons, with the…

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When Jesus came along two thousand years ago, His character and His posture toward people can be summed up with two primary words:

“We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth.” John 1:14 NIV

Now I know some pastors who are just FULL OF IT, but that’s not what I’m talking about!

If our lives, ministries, and churches are to be marked by the character and posture of Jesus, our ministries should by full of two primary components: GRACE and TRUTH.

Both are equally necessary. Both must be held in tension. Both must be in balance.

Truth without grace or grace without truth makes our ministries out of balance.

TRUTH WITHOUT GRACE is wrong.

Truth without grace is mean spirited. truth without grace beats up on people.

Truth without grace lacks love.

Truth without grace repels people away from Jesus.

Truth without grace tends to try to scare the Hell out of people…literally!

Truth without grace ceases to be the Gospel because the Gospel is Good News!

GRACE WITHOUT TRUTH is also wrong. 

Grace without truth lacks honesty.

Grace witout truth chooses not to confront sin.

Grace without truth is being nice…

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