Archives For Leadership

Burnout

The first step in growing your church while preventing burnout is conducting a heart check. Not your physical heart, although if you’re really burned out that may not be a bad idea. I’m talking about your emotional, spiritual heart.

What’s motivating you?

What’s motivating within the context of church can get complicated.

We’re working to serve God and people.

You’re preparing a sermon, leading a small group, running the lights and sound, or other tasks that contribute to telling people about Christ. Sometimes we can get so blinded by doing work for God that we neglect our relationship with God. That’s dangerous and can lead to the moral failures we’ve seen in the church lately or pastors/church staff burning out and leaving.

How do you conduct a heart check? Here are several areas to consider:

#1 – When did you last spend time in prayer and reading the Word that wasn’t for preparation of a sermon or other work-related activity?

We all need time with God that’s simply for the purpose of listening, learning, and enjoying his presence. It’s easy to try and justify not having personal time with God if you’ve already spent several…

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I’ve been involved in a great many organizations transitioning to next generation leadership, and the issue of “legacy” always comes up. How should the founder be remembered? When should the founder let go? The Billy Graham organization asked some of those questions when they designed their library and museum in Charlotte, North Carolina.  Many nonprofit and ministry organizations are making that transition right now, and when it comes to the hand-off, here are some thoughts:

1) It’s never too early to start. If the founder has reached his or her late fifties or sixties, it’s time to start thinking about legacy. At that age, the slightest health problem could derail their work, so we need a backup plan. Especially if you’ve built a major church, ministry, or non-profit, we need to start thinking about a successor. The succession doesn’t need to happen right away, but you need a solid plan. I know major ministry leaders who died unexpectedly, which made for some serious scrambling by their organizations.  So don’t be caught off guard.

2) The line, “Success without a successor is failure” is a myth. The fact is, not every organization is meant to extend to…

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I fail in life far more often than I care to admit. Maybe it’s my perfectionist tendencies or just the high bar that I set for myself. Regardless, failure has been and continues to be a regular part of my life. I miss deadlines. I disappoint people. I forget important things. I spell words wrong when I’m typing.

I would imagine that you’ve experience failure at least once before. Right? Please make me feel somewhat normal here…

Over the years, I’ve been around others as they’ve failed. And some do it well…and some not so well. Let me be honest – sometimes I do it well and sometimes I don’t. But, I believe there’s a five step process to go through in order to fail “well.” Here are the five steps:

Step one – Have the right attitude about it.

When you fail, don’t overreact. Don’t treat your failure like it’s the end of the world…or even the end of anything. Often mistakes and failures are built up in our minds to be larger than they really are. When we fail, it’s a great time to choose the right attitude. Understanding, before the…

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We’re all living and working in an increasingly fast-paced and ever-changing world.

Succeeding and excelling in today’s world require you to consider certain traits to be effective. In order to thrive in a fast-changing world, effective leaders make and implement decisions, possess agility, and include others in decision-making. Regardless of their respective industry, effective leaders make decisions and implement strategies to carry out their decision.

Making and Implementing Decisions

The critical task of leadership is making decisions. Unfortunately, there’s no way to know the outcome of the decisions we make. Effective leaders must decide where they’re going and how to get there.

Deciding where to go could be considered the vision. Having the plan to get there is the strategy. Once a leader decides where they’re going and how to get there the next critical task of leadership is implementation.

Ask yourself: What decision am I making and what’s my strategy to implement it?

Agility

The challenge of leadership is that we live in a “fast” and ever changing world. That means things happen quickly and to survive, leaders have to get their organizations to react equally quickly – and effectively – when those things happen. The…

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Delegation and empowerment are easier to write about than they are to actually implement. For anyone who has ever tried it, you have also learned that there need to be a few rules to help guide the person who’s been empowered. It’s not uncommon for the new leader to quickly use their new power to set off in unintended directions.

We need to not only give them power, but also some guiding principles.

May I suggest the following ABCs of empowerment?

1. Alignment

The greatest example of empowerment in the Bible is found in Matthew 28:16-20.  We commonly refer to this passage as the Great Commission.  In this passage Jesus empowers the leaders he has trained for the previous three years to fulfill his ongoing mission.  He tells them, “Guys, I’m outta here. I’m handing the baton to you now. Complete the work I started by making new disciples everywhere.” (Mossolonian Loose Translation)

Jesus is clear on the mission, vision, and values.  He is conspicuously vague on the methods. Of course, this is on purpose. Jesus wants his followers to focus on the eternal purposes of the church, not the cultural practices of a particular context.  This allows…

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Creativity matters in ministry. It matters because God is creative. He’s the most creative being in the entire universe. It only makes sense that we serve God with our creatively.

How do you develop a culture of innovation in your church?

You need a theology of innovation. We are most like our creator when we’re creative. God wired us to be creative. Children are very creative. They are born creative. It’s normal. We get the creativity kicked out of us as time goes by. We learn to be afraid. But a theology of innovation always reminds us that God intends us to be creative.

You need a creative atmosphere. There are certain environments I can be very creative in, and certain environments where I can’t. At Saddleback, we’ve never had a boardroom or the big boardroom-style table that comes with that. We have recliners. Meetings don’t start at Saddleback until we kick our feet up. It’s when I get in a totally prone position that I can be the most creative and can discover what God would have us do.

You need to stay playful. Playfulness stimulates creativity. When you get people laughing, you get the endorphins…

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Starting something new is much easier than transitioning something established.

Currently, I serve as lead pastor of the Mars Hill Baptist Church of Chicago. I succeeded my father, the late Rev. Dr. Clarence E. Stowers, Sr. who served for thirty-six years. The church I inherited was a traditional African American Baptist Church rich with tradition.

After five years of praying, meeting, teaching, leading, and building supportive teams, we transitioned to a contemporary church. During the process, I almost quit, but decided to pivot and stick it out. It was the best decision of my life. In life, you’ll eventually come to a crossroad. When it happens, you must decide if you’ll stick with it, quit, or pivot. How do you know which choice is best? I chose to pivot.

So, What Does it Mean to Pivot?

I love sports, and when I hear the word pivot, immediately basketball comes to mind. When basketball players stop dribbling the ball, they must decide which foot is their pivot foot. Upon deciding, they can’t switch feet. Pivoting is the term used to define both the act of keeping one foot in place while…

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When it comes to leadership, perhaps the most often used passage in the Bible is Exodus, chapter 18This is the story in which Moses allows his father-in-law, Jethro, to work with him. After a long day of exhausting work as judge, teacher, commander, and priest of Yahweh for millions of people, Jethro pulls Moses aside for a little hear- to-heart.

Jethro sees a micromanager driving himself into an early grave, trying to do too much. He gets Moe’s attention pretty fast when he says, “Dude, you’re dumb!” (ok, that’s the Mossolonian translation)

Jethro then lays out some pretty solid wisdom that every leader needs to learn.

Three Basic Principles of Effective Leadership

1. Clarification

You should continue to be the people’s representative before God…teach God’s decrees…give instructions…and show how to live…” (verses 19-20)

Jethro started out by clarifying Moses’ calling.

The most powerful principle of leadership is about self-discovery. Every leader must discover their unique leadership contribution. Leaders need clarity on their God-given gifts, skills, passion, leadership style, and what their story has been preparing them for.

It is not enough to have leadership gifts or skills.

Leaders have to be crystal clear on why they’re here.

Once you are clear on your specific role in the whole,…

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Money.Dollars

Pink Floyd got it wrong when they lyricized that “money is the root of all evil,” but they weren’t far off the mark. Financial issues are cited as the number one cause of divorce, and having helped more couples work through financial issues than I can count, I’ve seen how money can be a destructive force in our lives.

I think that’s why Jesus talked more about money than almost any other topic. He knew it would be a stumbling block for us. Thankfully, He built His church to disciple His followers, and part of that discipleship process should include training them to manage His resources well. The problem with most churches today is that, unlike Jesus, they avoid the money issue. Or, when they do address it, it’s only to talk about giving. Every church should have financial stewardship included in its discipleship process. It’s not about raising money for the church, it’s about growing God’s people to maturity so that they can steward God’s funds as He directs. If we do that, it will mean a more spiritually vibrant church full of people who are eager to financially support the work of…

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Vision

One of the questions I’m asked most often is “How do I get God’s vision or dream for our church?” Frankly, a lot of pastors’ visions that I’ve heard have more to do with ego than God’s will.

I’d recommend you answer these questions:

  1. What has God called the church to be? What is our purpose? Why did God create His church in the first place?
    This is the issue of identity and purpose. Why do we exist? At Saddleback, the answer is that we are here to fulfill the five eternal purposes of the church. These five purposes are given in the Great Commandment and Great Commission. Jesus illustrated them in his prayer for his disciples as he summed up his ministry on earth (John 17). Paul explains these five purposes in Ephesians, chapter four and the church at Jerusalem modeled these five purposes in Acts, chapter two. The church was created to worship, fellowship, evangelize, minister and disciple people. The world is constantly changing but God’s eternal purposes never change. They are the foundation of any God-given vision.
  2. What is God doing in the world?
    Where is He moving? Where is the wave of his Spirit? What does…

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Several months ago, I started banging an idea around in my head. If pastors were truly healthy, how would it impact churches? The conclusion that I came to was that, if our pastors are healthy, our churches will be healthy. What does that look like?

1. The church with a Healthy Pastor has a more energized pastor.

Pastors that have made physical and emotional health a priority bring a greater level of energy to everything that they do. They can preach longer (Some will say that might not really be a blessing). They can serve longer. They can do more because their bodies are not giving up on them. How many pastors have trouble standing for the length of their sermon? How many are so tired from preaching a hard message that they are unable to accomplish anything else? The desire may be there, but if a pastor isn’t caring for his physical body by eating right, getting enough rest, and exercising, he will not be able to accomplish all that God has for him to do. Our bodies are machines, wonderfully designed, biological machines, but still machines. We know that if we don’t properly…

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Your congregation can invest in eternity by using their money for God’s purposes. It is secure. It is risk free. It comes with guaranteed interest. It yields dividends forever.

The Bible says, “Tell people to use their money to do good. They should be rich in good works and should give happily to those in need, always being ready to share whatever God has given them. By doing this they’ll be storing up real treasure for themselves in heaven. It is the only safe investment for eternity and they will be living a fruitful Christian life down here as well.” (1 Timothy 6:18-19, TLB)

1. Invest in God’s treasury fund (worship).

This is the investment fund most of your congregation will know about – tithing. We invest in the treasury fund by using some of our money to express worship.

There’s nothing we can give God that he needs. And God certainly doesn’t need our money. But when we give an offering to God – an undesignated, planned, and proportional offering where and when we worship – we’re saying, “God I love you.”

The Bible says, “Honor the Lord by giving him the first part of all your…

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