Archives For Leadership

Friends

Leaders are often lonely. It’s tragic when ministry leaders can preach to large numbers of people while slowly dying of personal isolation. For the sake of your emotional and relational health and your long term effectiveness, you need to develop friendships. Here’s why:

  • God formed you for fellowship and for friendship.
  • Friends help us to grow spiritually.
  • Friends hold us up and support us when we suffer.
  • Friends keep us accountable to life with integrity.
  • Friends are fun! We need to enjoy life with people.

Obviously the best place for people to find friends is at church. This is why we encourage people to get involved in a small group and volunteer alongside others on a ministry team. But pastors often struggle to know whether or not they should get close to people, especially people in the church. But the risk we take by getting close to people is always worth it. It was worth it for Jesus, and it’s worth it for you as a church leader.

Knowing that you need friends is only the beginning. Actually building friendships is vital. So how do you do that? If you really want to have great, deep, meaningful,…

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I believe churches only grow when their Senior Pastors have a crystal clear vision of where God wants to take their church, and that vision is broadly shared, and owned.

Below is a three-year snapshot of a twenty year plan we believe God has set before us as a church. It contains specific, actionable shifts that must be made and opportunities that must be capitalized upon to become the church God has called us to become.

Notice that while we’re keeping our twenty year focus in mind, this is only for what we must address in the next three years.

If you’re not operating off of a crystal clear three year strategy as a team, I would move heaven and earth to make sure you have one in place by the Fall.

I believe that you’ll find the process of identifying areas that need addressed, and formulating the strategy to make those changes a reality, both enriching and exciting.

CCV’s 2020 Vision

Since the beginning God has called us to plant a church in the suburbs of Philadelphia, which would grow past 5,000+ and in turn plant 20 daughter campuses of 1,000+ each throughout the metro area. This will happen by the end…

This article originally appeared at SeniorPastorCentral.com.

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Healthy relationships matter…

You can implement the best time management strategies known to mankind.

You can preach a masterful sermon or enthrall a room of preteens with a Biblical message.

You can have a staff of extremely talented individuals who create the best worship sets, graphics, and social media engagement.

You can have or do all of these things and still have an unhealthy church if you don’t have healthy relationships.

Don’t believe me?

“Though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I have become sounding brass or a clanging cymbal. And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and though I have all faith, so that I could remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. And though I bestow all my goods to feed the poor, and though I give my body to be burned, but have not love, it profits me nothing.” – 1 Corinthians 13:1-7

  • Speaking well
  • Prophesying
  • Having incredible knowledge
  • Having faith that moves mountains
  • Giving everything you own to the poor
  • Giving up your very life

All of these talents and offerings are worthless without…

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Vision statements are a dime a dozen as far as I’m concerned. Everyone these days has a vision statement. A few years ago, everyone had a “2020 Vision.” Soon it will be a “2050 Vision,” and so on. At the end of the day, however, a vision statement is just a statement. It has no life on its own. It cannot, nor will it ever, energize, unify, or align an organization. This task falls to the leader. A vision statement is only as strong as the leader is. Vision is only as clear as the leader is. Vision is only as compelling as a leader makes it.

A vision is stewarded and sustained by a leader.

A vision defines why we exist. No matter what we call it,preserving the vision requires we answer one question at the outset: “Why are we here?” The vision is our bull’s­eye. Let’s keep it simple. Leadership involves keeping our organization so focused on the vision that people are willing to sacrifice for it. If we get that right, everything else will fall in place.

Them , how do we communicate it? How do we get everyone passionate about it as…

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Rejection is powerful.

When I counsel people, sometimes I hear them say, “I don’t care if people like me, as long as they respect me.” When they say that, it’s an “emotional wall they use to block the hurt of rejection,” according to psychologist Marcia Reynolds.

God created us to be social, and if we’re honest, all of us care if people like us. “The feeling of love, affection, and belonging is necessary before we can reach the highest levels of consciousness and wisdom,” according to psychologist Abraham Maslow.  Maslow is saying we all need people to survive. So, how do keep from withdrawing when dealing with someone who doesn’t like you?

Fortunately, you’re not the only one who’s had to deal with this problem. After Nathan had anointed David as the future King of Israel, Saul became his bitter enemy. Like David, all of us, at one time or another deal with people we don’t like and who don’t like us. Perhaps you have people who want to do you harm and see you fail. This is where David found himself in 1 Samuel Chapter 24.

His enemy, Saul, wanted to…

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If your church has plateaued it could be because you have tried to lead everything by consensus.

There’s a colossal difference between pseudo-leadership (leading everything by consensus) and biblically-based, godly, unifying, strong, decisive, servant leadership.

The Consensus Trap In Smaller Churches

I see this occur most often in smaller churches where a leader has rallied around themselves a small group of men and women to plant or restart a plateaued church. The problem that occurs is that as they try to grow from one stage to the next the leader looks around at the people who have sacrificed just as much as he has and feels that because of their sacrifices they deserve an equal voice in the church’s future direction.

That happens in part because in the early years the leader did in fact solicit everyone’s opinion in the group before making a decision. But at that attendance size and staff configuration that process was healthy and natural.

Along the way the leader was sure to measure everyone’s relational temperature, mitigating risk by putting out fires before they started. Everyone was in on every decision.

As time went on, that group, having been consulted in every decision early on, quickly developed the false perception…

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City

How big and influential is your leadership? What kind of leader are you? Are you aware enough to know the honest answers to these questions? One of the greatest mistakes leaders make is thinking we are far more influential than we really are. If all a leader listens to and communicates with are the people who think like them and personally connect to them, they are greatly limiting their leadership potential.

People with Much Diversity

In my present responsibilities as President of the Southern Baptist Convention, I have the incredible challenge of providing leadership to a mass of people filled with a diversity of opinions and preferences. Speaking of diversity, twenty percent of our 51,000 plus churches and congregations are non-white.

This task to provide leadership to men, women, pastors and laypersons requires me to value each person and their uniqueness in the body of Christ. Big and influential leadership requires that I listen to and involve all walks of life as much as possible. It comes down to one thing… my goal of leadership.

The Goal of Leadership

Our goal should be to make the biggest difference in as many lives as we possibly can. Therefore, we need to…

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“You are to look for capable men among the people, men who fear God, men of integrity who hate dishonest gain. You are to set these men over them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens.” – Exodus 18:21 NIV

In this day and age, women are hungry to lead and serve within the body of Christ. The traditional Women’s Ministry model has left women wanting more and turning to other avenues to serve and lead out of their SHAPE (spiritual gifts, heart, abilities, personality and experiences). As the Women’s Minister at Saddleback Church, there is one thing I have heard loud and clear: women are ready, willing and able to serve and lead well. They just need one thing – permission. They need the space and encouragement to use their gifts for God’s glory. At the same time, I have come to understand that to unleash this army of women I cannot (nor do I want to) do it alone. In order to prevent burnout, ministry leaders must give away what they have been given to those men or women who have been called to join the battle. How does this happen effectively?

Through…

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You don’t know it all. There are limits to your knowledge, ability, and energy. And while the competitive nature of our culture, which often sneaks into our lives in ministry, would have us to hid all of our weaknesses in fear, there is tremendous power in becoming vulnerable with people.

Deciding to become vulnerable is risky. As church leaders, there will be people in our congregations who don’t want us to be human. They would prefer that we wear a halo and pretend that we’re never really tempted to sin in the same ways that they are. They feel safer if we, as spiritual leaders, are immune to the crass realities of life.

But when we hide our weaknesses, three big problems arise:

  • Our weaknesses get worse, feeding off of the shame and secrecy.
  • We become dishonest and hypocritical.
  • The truth inevitably comes out and people are disillusioned as a result.

So is bearing our vulnerability worth the risk? Absolutely. Here are some important reasons why vulnerability is a forgotten virtue of great leadership…

1. It’s emotionally healthy.

Maintaining an image of perfection requires enormous amounts of emotional energy. One of the reasons we sometimes get so stressed out and depressed is…

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Ready to Serve

Pastor, you were created by God to serve your congregation. What he told the prophet Jeremiah is also true for you: “Before I made you in your mother’s womb, I chose you. Before you were born, I set you apart for a special work.” (Jeremiah 1:5, NCV)

God redeemed you so you could do his holy work. In God’s kingdom, you have a place, a purpose, a role, and a function to fulfill, and this gives your life great significance and special value, no matter how discouraged you may feel right now. You are not God’s child by this service, but as God’s child you were created for this service.

The Bible says, “You were chosen to tell about the excellent qualities of God, who called you.” (1 Peter 2:9, GW) Anytime you use your God-given abilities to help others, you are fulfilling your calling. In some churches in China, they welcome new believers by saying – “Jesus now has a new pair of eyes with which to see, a new set of ears for listening, two new hands for which to help, and a new heart for loving others.”

You’re not only the eyes, ears,…

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I’ve failed more than I’ve succeeded. I’ve been criticized much more than I’ve been complemented. I’ve been thrown into circumstances that I’ve never been in before many more times than finding myself somewhere familiar. And because of those truths, it makes me fearful that those trends will continue and I will ultimately find myself unemployed, alone, and isolated.

Maybe you can relate. I make decisions… worried that it won’t work out. I assign tasks… scared that they won’t follow through. I lead the team into the future… doubting that goals will be accomplished. Sound familiar at all?

Don’t get me wrong, I wish that fear wasn’t a part of my life. I sincerely hope that, one day, I’ll be in a place where I have so much confidence that fear dare not rear its ugly face. But that day is not today.

And the truth is that we leaders don’t do a good job at all of sharing these fears. We don’t want to get vulnerable or seem like we don’t have it all together. Although I don’t advocate this, I completely understand. But, I have come to find over the many years of leadership that we…

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Religious Liberty On Decline

By Bob Smietana

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A growing number of Americans believe religious liberty is on the decline and that the nation’s Christians face growing intolerance.

They also say American Christians complain too much.

Those are among the findings of a new study of views about religious liberty from LifeWay Research. Researchers surveyed 1,000 Americans in September 2013 and September 2015 and then compared the results.

Two-thirds (63 percent) say Christians face increasing intolerance, up from half (50 percent) in 2013.

A similar number (60 percent) say religious liberty is on the decline, up from just over half (54 percent) in 2013.

Forty-three percent say American Christians…

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