7 Keys to Preventing Pastoral Burnout

By Thom S. Rainer

BurnoutI have the incredible opportunity to interact with pastors regularly. In recent conversations, I have asked two questions. First, have you ever experienced burnout in your ministry? Second, what do you do to prevent pastoral burnout?

Interestingly, every pastor with whom I spoke had experienced some level of burnout. So they spoke from the voice of experience when they shared with me what they do to prevent burnout. I aggregated their responses to seven keys to preventing pastoral burnout, not in any particular order or priority.

1. Remember your call. Ministry can be tough and dirty. It can be frustrating and confusing. But if we remember Who called us and Who sustains us, we are able to persevere. We understand we are not doing ministry in our own power.

2. Pray for your critics. Criticism is one of the most frequently mentioned causes of burnout. Pastors on the other side of burnout told me they have learned to pray for their critics almost every day. It has given the pastors a fresh perspective. A few pastors even noted significant change in their critics shortly after they started praying for them.

3. Wait a day before responding to critics. Somewhat related to number two above, some pastors shared that ministry began to take its toll when they engaged their critics negatively in writing, in person or by phone. Now these pastors wait a full day before responding, and they are amazed at how differently their responses take shape.

4. Be intentional about downtime. Pastors need it. Their families need it. Every week. Don’t skip vacations. Go on occasional retreats. Don’t lose your family by trying to save your church.

5. Find a friend to share your burden. For some pastors, it was another pastor. For others, it was a retired pastor. Some mentioned that key confidants in the church had become their best friends. Pastors need someone they trust to whom they can unload their burdens.

6. Do not neglect your prayer life. Pastors told me repeatedly that, as their prayer life waned, their burnout increased. For them, prayer was first an ongoing conversation with God, but it was also a time for spiritual refueling.

7. Do not neglect your time in the Word. We heard similar stories from pastors who began neglecting their time in the Bible. As that time waned, burnout increased. All the pastors noted that time in the Word was time beyond sermon preparation. It was a time of personal devotion and study.

Pastors are burning out every day. Many are leaving the ministry as a result. It is a real and immediate problem with many pastors and many churches.

Thom S. Rainer

Thom S. Rainer

Thom S. Rainer serves as president and CEO of LifeWay Christian Resources. Among his greatest joys are his family: his wife Nellie Jo; three sons, Sam,  Art, and Jess; and seven grandchildren. Dr. Rainer can be found on Twitter @ThomRainer and at facebook.com/Thom.S.Rainer.