3 Questions To Help You Re-Think Your Ministry

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When was the last time you stopped to ask, “How can we make this better?” in regards to a particular program or ministry? If you’re having a hard time remembering, this post is for you. If there’s one lesson the Church has been forced to learn over the past few decades, it’s that sometimes we need to re-think why we are doing what we are doing.

Taking the time to deconstruct our ministry is the only way we can know what is working and what is not so we can start taking the steps to reach more people with the Gospel. If we fail to do so, our churches could end up on Pinterest.

If your church wants to continue to grow in the direction that will lead to more lives changed, here are three questions you should consistently ask to deconstruct your ministry in order to improve it:

1. Why did this ministry start?

In his book Start with Why, author Simon Sinek reveals an interesting concept that he found after studying the leaders who had the greatest influence in the world. During his research, Sinek found that although organizations achieved success through varying means, the one thing they all shared is that they tied every decision back to the greater why.

If you want to keep your ministry moving forward and heading in the right direction, take time to rediscover the why. This will give you a litmus test for measuring every aspect of your ministry as you continue to deconstruct what is working and what is not.

2. Are your strategies satisfying the why?

Once you’ve re-calibrated and understand why you’re doing the things you’re doing, the next step is to look at how each strategy helps you accomplish your goals and satisfy the why. If you can look at a particular ministry and say beyond a shadow of a doubt that it is helping you achieve your goals, good. But if you’re unsure, you might need to dig a little deeper into the next question.

Note: Just because a strategy was fulfilling the why last year, that doesn’t mean it’s working as well this year. That’s why it’s important to take time to deconstruct your ministry on a regular basis.

3. What is next?

After you’ve answered the first two questions, you have two choices: reconstruct or abandon. Sometimes it is as easy as reconstructing the ministry with more focus, but other times, we need to just abandon ship and meet our goals with other approaches. What needs to be eliminated all together? What can be shaved off? There is always excess in our ministries. By taking the time to evaluate what is needed for what’s next, we can identify the redundancies in our ministry and trim them away.

What are ways you stay on target with your ministries?

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About Justin Lathrop

With over a dozen years of local church ministry Justin has spent the last several years starting business' and ministries that partner with pastors and churches to advance the Kingdom. He is the founder of Helpstaff.me (now Vanderbloemen Search), Oaks School of Leadership, and MinistryCoach.tv all while staying involved in the local church.

Justin is obsessed with connecting people to people and lives his life daily to make the world a smaller place. He now serves as a consultant in the area of strategic relations predominately working with the Assemblies of God, helping to build bridges with people and ministries to more effectively reach more people.

He blogs regularly about what he has learned from making connection at www.justinlathrop.com.


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